Claudia Ghetu WELLness

The Wisdom of Ancient Science for Advanced Healing and Transformation


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Yoga: The Ultimate Quest for Inner Self

When asked ‘what is yoga’ most might define it as a type of physical activity or even a form of exercise that strengthens or relaxes the body.  More advanced practitioners might speak about the kind of regular commitment and discipline yoga entails, and the emphasis on breath, yet still equate the mastery of challenging poses to a successful practice. These interpretations, however, disproportionately emphasize the physical aspects of yoga and falsely portray an ideology that couldn’t be further from the truth.  Yoga is in fact about the mastery of the mind – not of the physical body.  As I came to learn during my yoga training, it is only through the mastery of the mind that we can master our bodies, and beyond that even more importantly release ourselves from pain and suffering. So can yoga actually alter our minds and liberate us from hurtful experiences? Pantanjali, the original yogi master and author of the revered ancient texts comprising the Yoga Sutra, outlines in great detail all the rituals and steps involved in the pursuit of self-transformation, the ultimate goal being: to liberate ourselves from the shackles of a meaningless existence and the trappings of samsara. Yoga derives from the Sanskrit word yuj, which means to bind or join, and its very mastery enables one to bind with or attain communion with Brahman, or the Supreme Being – or God.

Yoga teaches us how to contain our mind, and outlines the methods by which we can begin to purify our thoughts and actions by escaping the trappings of delusion, attachment, and diversion – and in that process purify and strengthen our bodies.  It has little to do with exercise and nothing to do with athletic prowess. The emphasis is the total commitment towards the study and practice of the higher moral principles outlined in detail in the Eight Limbs of Yoga, through the application of which one can work towards purifying his mind and his spirit.  One of the branches, which comprise the Eight Limbs, is Yama(s), translated as Ethical Principles or Restraint(s) from: violence, stealing, lying, sexual irresponsibility, and hoarding. This is just the tip of the iceberg. One could spend an entire lifetime just focusing on mastering just one of the Eight Limbs of Yoga, like cultivating santosa or contentment. There are millions of people daily who practice yoga but who never look deeper or even have an understanding of the sacred and profound wisdom behind this ancient practice.  That is because yoga has become diluted and manipulated in Western society to fit our fixated competitive ideas of ‘how to achieve perfection’ – and that ideal is grounded on the physical rather than the spiritual realm. Inasmuch as it has been preserved in its original content, Yoga has taken on the guise of an evolving trend, promoting inventive derivatives and namesake variants, and that evolution has placed a primary emphasis on physical results, forcing one into the trappings of ego and competitiveness. As long as we keep believing that beauty and worldly satisfaction is something we can achieve by altering our bodies and other external factors, rather than altering or rather, awakening our inner state of consciousness, we will never get to anywhere close to what true reality is.  Yoga is not a competitive sport – although in time we might see it become that.  But there will always be those of us who will strive to peer deeper, and who will remain true to the source in its pure and original form.

The ultimate goal is to attain enlightenment and free ourselves from the chains that bind us to the physical world – our uncontrolled inner world that deludes our senses and keeps us stuck in a state of unresolved conflicts, and painful attachments. Buddhism and Yoga have the same scope. It is all about the training of the mind to overcome samsara, or cyclical suffering. Whereas Buddhism is more focused on the practice of deep meditation in its own sacred rituals, yogis use meditation in conjunction with breath control or pranayama and also engage the body to fully express and translate into physical practice the Yoga Sutra principles. According to theBhagavad Gita, the most important text on yoga philosophy, “When the restlessness of the mind, intellect and self is stilled through the practice of Yoga, the yogi by the grace of the Spirit within himself finds fulfillment. Then he knows the joy eternal, which is beyond the pale of the senses which his reason cannot grasp. This is the real meaning of Yoga: a deliverance from contact with pain and sorrow.” Yoga teaches us how to transcend the trappings of a self-induced false reality, and pursue the one true path that will liberate us from this unawakened state, which keeps us in a perpetual state of neurosis and dissatisfaction.  The ultimate goal of yoga has little to do with how long one can hold an impeccably composed asana or pose. It is about freeing our minds to attain the ultimate goal: the union with our divine source, and that ever-present teacher within.  In the words of Iyengar: “The yogi does not look heavenward to find God. He knows that He is within, being known as the Antaratma (The Inner Self)…By profound meditation the knower, the knowledge and the known become one. The seer, the sight, and the seen have no separate existence from each other. It is like a great musician becoming one with his instrument. Then, the yogi stands in his own nature and realizes his self (Atman), the part of the Supreme Soul within himself.”

What is Yoga? Yoga is ultimately the art of mastering going within. It is the sacred knowledge by which we can discover the deepest of truths, attain the liberation of our mind, and spirit, and dissolve into perfect communion with our Divine Self.


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The Noble Truth of “Non-Striving”

Buddhist philosophy is founded on The Four Noble Truths, The Third Noble Truth being the truth of the goal, which is Non-Striving. Only in the absence of struggle are we able to start seeing the reality of things, including seeing through our delusions and our ego-driven, suffering inducing schemes. Our greatest pains and disappointments arise from those things we try so hard to grasp on to and secure. We are constantly struggling to achieve and possess ‘things’ which are outside our means, and ironically those very things we want, or think we want, don’t even in fact exist or satisfy beyond our illusions. They are just thought forms built out of the smoke of our ignorance. How many times did you think you might look good in a certain outfit, only to try it on and say to yourself: what was I thinking? How many times did you have a set idea or plan rooted in mind which once realized was not at all as great as you had imagined. We live in a world of a rampant imagination running wild and dictating our thirsty cravings, and a blurry reality which we must learn to befriend even in the face of our greatest fears. The perfect ‘this’ and ‘that’ doesn’t exist. Yet we convince ourselves otherwise and thus strive ad infinitum for those things which we can never possess; things we think we want but aren’t in fact sure we even know how or if we can handle. When we begin to cultivate a still mind through the Forth Noble Path, which is Meditation, we begin to embark on a transformative journey of awareness and calm which allows us to finally see the forest beyond the trees. No judgement, no attachment to outcome. In order to pacify our untrained neurotic minds we have to sit and observe our uncontrollable fears and impulses and face them head on. Buddhists believe that those who are not yet enlightened are afflicted by mental neurosis, which subjects them to delusional, obsessive, and impulsive thinking. Thus we begin to detach ourselves from those mental addictions, from those things we falsely and ignorantly identify ourselves with – wealth, power, beauty, perfection. When we reach the place where we can let go of striving to become a certain way, we are liberated from the exhausting pursuit of ‘achieving.’ Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche said, ‘There is no need to struggle to be free; the absence of struggle is in itself freedom.’ When it comes to wanting to ‘better ourselves’ we have to be mindful and compassionate in our intention, and try to put all goals aside. Goals make us strive. Goals make us fail. Goals make us blame ourselves.

When we get guilted into changing something about ourselves, by others or by our own selves, we inevitably embark on a path that is counter-productive to our own growth and well being. Psychiatry still focuses on one’s mental affliction or illness and what went wrong/failed instead of one’s intuitive righteousness, mental strength, and innate intelligence. An individual goes on a diet believing there is something wrong and bad about how he or she looks, striving to root out something that must be eradicated. We are wired to believe there is always something or someone to blame – and that blame is often self-inflicted projecting the ‘good’ versus ‘bad’ self. Where there is blame, there is guilt, and ultimately there will be punishment on some level. Sometimes we have to allow compassionate room for failure in order to succeed. We are already perfect as we are – it’s just a matter of becoming more aware of that fact, and being able to reconnect to our own perfect nature with pure, unconditional compassion, another pillar of Buddhist philosophy.

When we strive for something, or try to push or discipline ourselves to accomplish a particular goal, we tend to stand in our own way by taking an overly rigid and judgmental attitude toward ourself. That is why most people abandon their conviction that they can overcome something – because it is too hard to attain anything under those harsh self-condemning conditions. So if you want to truly get somewhere, don’t make a big fuss about it. Don’t try too hard to get there. Begin walking in the direction where you want to go, and the path will gently and unexpectedly unfold before you – leading you to a better-than-you-could-have-expected destination, beyond delusion and beyond goal reaching. Remember, it’s always been about the journey not the destination in the first place. You just never saw the forest for the trees, because you always tried too hard to see much farther.  When you stop trying, you get to where you need to be.

Ask Yourself: When was the last time I was overly judgmental and hard on myself? Are the goals I set for myself unrealistic, or self-sabotaging? How can I be more compassionate toward myself and others, and struggle less in my daily life?